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​Welcome to the Cal OES Frequently Asked Questions!

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This looks really different! What if I can’t find somethingThis looks really different! What if I can’t find something<p>​Try using the search! We’ve done a ton of work to ensure that Search is much more robust, returns better (more accurate) results, and can be filtered/refined to help customers find content!</p>
What if I still can’t find something? Can someone help me?What if I still can’t find something? Can someone help me?<p>​The Web Team can help! Contact us by emailing webmaster@caloes.ca.gov to ask questions! We’re happy to help you or our customers find content. Keep in mind, while the transition from old to new has gone very smoothly, we may not hit 100% completion for several weeks past launch, so – it’s possible something hasn’t been moved yet. <br>It’s also very possible that some content was deemed outdated or no longer relevant and was therefore not moved!</p>
What if I find a typo or a bug in the site?What if I find a typo or a bug in the site?<p>Please notify the Web Team! Our email, webmaster@caloes.ca.gov, can be given out to your clients and constituents!​</p>
I thought of a great idea/feature and I was wondering if we can get it built into the site?I thought of a great idea/feature and I was wondering if we can get it built into the site?<p>We’re happy to look into any and all feature requests! If you think of something, send it along to webmaster@caloes.ca.gov!​</p>
The California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) doesn’t have a lot of authority over natural gas storage wells, but could the CPUC could (or is it considering) expanding its oversight of storage facilities, in light of SB 1371 and the Porter Ranch leak?The California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) doesn’t have a lot of authority over natural gas storage wells, but could the CPUC could (or is it considering) expanding its oversight of storage facilities, in light of SB 1371 and the Porter Ranch leak?<p>​The CPUC does not have operational and safety jurisdiction over the injection/withdrawal wells at natural gas storage facilities. However, the CPUC has regulatory, safety, and operational authority over SoCalGas and gas pipelines. The intention of SB 1371 and subsequent CPUC proceedings was to consider methane emissions from gas pipelines. The assigned Commissioner and Administrative Law Judge will consider any requests for expansion of scope through the standard proceeding procedure. In addition, the CPUC could exercise its regulatory authority over gas storage fields to reduce methane emissions pursuant to Public Utilities (PU) Code Section 451 and AB 32 – after the CPUC determines the breadth of this issue and identifies possible solutions. The CPUC has required SoCalGas to hire an interdependent third-party to conduct a root cause analysis to determine the reason for the leak. After this analysis is completed, the CPUC will use the information to inform future actions.​</p>
What authority does the CPUC currently have and could it take on more oversight of storage facilities?What authority does the CPUC currently have and could it take on more oversight of storage facilities?<p>​The CPUC grants operating permits – Certificates of Public Convenience and Necessity – to natural gas storage providers pursuant to PU Code Section 1001. One of the CPUC’s primary jurisdictional responsibilities with respect to gas storage fields is to ensure there is enough storage in California to meet demand. See PU Code Section 3368. SoCalGas and PG&E are rate regulated utilities, so the CPUC has authority over the recovery of costs of the utilities for operating the gas storage facilities that they own, like Aliso Canyon. The CPUC also has authority to ensure that SoCalGas’s actions in response to the leak are reasonable.<br></p>
Is there a fee to attend?Is there a fee to attend?<p>Preparedness is a FREE event. There is no fee to attend and we encourage you to bring the entire family!<br></p>
Is there parking available in Old Sacramento?Is there parking available in Old Sacramento?<p>Paid parking is available in Old Sacramento. For more information on location and parking rates, visit <a href="http://www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=497">http://www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=497</a><br></p>
Will there be fun activities for children?Will there be fun activities for children?<p>Yes! Preparedness Day is family-friendly event. There will be lots of interactive displays, face painting and many more kid-friendly activities. They’ll also have the chance to meet with real life heroes.<br></p>
Are animals welcome?Are animals welcome?<p>Animals are not prohibited from the park and our furry friends are an important part of our emergency preparedness plans. We would like to remind pet owners to keep safety tips in mind such as water needs, leashes, hot cement awareness and other steps to make sure pets are comfortable and safe.<br></p>
Will there be demonstrations?Will there be demonstrations?<p>YES! There will be live action-packed demonstrations throughout the day including K-9 demos and public safety rescue operations.<br></p>
Will there be food trucks?Will there be food trucks?<p>Definitely. There will be a tasty selection of various food and sweet treats available for purchase.<br></p>
What will the weather be like?What will the weather be like?<p>Weather forecast shows weather will be in the high 90s. Make sure to stay hydrated and take steps to protect yourself from heat (hats, sunglasses, sunblock, etc.) <br></p>
Any thing else to keep in mind when attending this event?Any thing else to keep in mind when attending this event?<p>We encourage you to check out our <a href="https://www.facebook.com/events/2044581259004985/">Facebook event page</a> and RSVP. Help us get Californians even more prepared by spreading the word about this event to your friends, family and neighbors.<br></p>
Is it possible or practical to close down the Aliso Canyon storage facility? Is it possible or practical to close down the Aliso Canyon storage facility? <p>​The CPUC has been working diligently with the Division of Oil, Gas & Geothermal Resources (DOGGR) to support DOGGR’s efforts to shut down the leaking well. It is not clear at this time that shutting down the facility would abate the leak. It is also not clear what the ramifications for gas reliability and electricity prices would be from a sudden shut down of the facility.​</p>
What impact would a shutdown have on consumers?What impact would a shutdown have on consumers?<p>​The CPUC is analyzing this issue, in conjunction with other agencies including DOGGR, the California Energy Commission, and the California Air Resources Board. At this time, it is not clear what the magnitude of the impact would be. Due to the size of the storage facility, the CPUC is concerned about the cost and reliability impacts of a sudden shutdown.<br></p>
Who creates the messages that are distributed on EDIS?Who creates the messages that are distributed on EDIS?<p>​Emergency notification originators are the only entities authorized to create and distribute EDIS messages.</p>
Why was the EDIS by Email service eliminated?Why was the EDIS by Email service eliminated?<p>​The service had been provided at no charge by a third party vendor for several years. Recently, the vendor declared they no longer would provide the service. Due to disagreements with rates and upcoming improvement to our emergency notification systems, it was determined that EDIS by Email would be discontinued until a new system comes on-line. In the meantime, options outside of email to include RSS notifications and BAM Software which can be loaded onto your PC can be used to receive EDIS notifications.</p>
Why do I get the untrusted prompt when I download the EDIS software?Why do I get the untrusted prompt when I download the EDIS software?<p>This indicates that the security certificate for the website has expired. The certificate will be updated once the new system is in place but in the meantime, we recommend you select- "Continue to this website..." to download the software.</p>
When will EDIS be upgraded to support SMS Text messaging?When will EDIS be upgraded to support SMS Text messaging?<p>​A new system which will integrate with FEMA's Integrated Public Alert and Warning System (IPAWS) to include a component to send notification via text messages to cellular devices will be available to Cal OES in the coming months. Currently, several counties and the National Weather Service are using IPAWS to compliment their existing notification capabilities.</p>
What is Cal OES?What is Cal OES?<p>Cal OES is the Emergency Management authority for the State of California.  ​</p>
What if I forget my user name or password for Cal EOC login?What if I forget my user name or password for Cal EOC login?<p>​Your user name is your work email address. Have you changed the password from the temporary password? If so, and you are still not able to access the system, click on the “forgot user name/password” and follow the instructions.<br></p>
I’m sure I’m entering a correct password and it won’t let me in? I’m on the CalEOC (blue and light grey) screenI’m sure I’m entering a correct password and it won’t let me in? I’m on the CalEOC (blue and light grey) screen<p>Have you changed the password from the temporary password? If so, and you are still not able to access the system, click on the “forgot user name/password” and follow the instructions.</p>
Can I adjust the format of a printed report?Can I adjust the format of a printed report?<p>​Yes. Right click on the screen you want to print and choose Print Preview. </p><p>On the print preview screen, change ‘As laid out on screen’ to ‘All frames individually’. Then click on Page Setup.</p><p>On Page Setup, Print Background Colors and Images and Enable Shrink to Fit are checked. Set the three header boxes to Empty and two of the three footer boxes to Empty. You can choose which of the three footers to print the Page # of Total Pages (left, center or right justified). You may also want to select Landscape rather than portrait depending on the report. Then select Ok. </p><p>Now you can click the Print button in the top left corner. This should give you a fairly good print without using the standard ‘print button’ on the screen or the PDF generator. </p>
Who currently has access to Cal EOC?Who currently has access to Cal EOC?<ul><li>​Cal OES key response and recovery personnel</li><li>Counties: All 58 County Emergency Management Agencies<br></li><li>State: California State Agencies with emergency response roles</li><li>Federal: key Federal Emergency Management personnel<br></li></ul>
Will the other agencies like cities and special districts have access to Cal EOC?Will the other agencies like cities and special districts have access to Cal EOC?<p>​Additional user groups have been added as a future scope consideration.</p>
Who do I call to track down a payment due to us?Who do I call to track down a payment due to us?<p>​Public Assistance Grants Processing Unit at (916) 845-8110</p>
Is the suspension of CEQA by the Governor in this CDAA program a state-wide or project specific suspension?Is the suspension of CEQA by the Governor in this CDAA program a state-wide or project specific suspension?<p>​Enclosed herewith is the Proclamation of a State of Emergency regarding tree mortality. CEQA is encoded in Sections 21000 et seq. of the Public Resources Code. The scope and applicability of the suspension of Division 13 (commencing with section 21000) of the Public Resources Code and regulations adopted pursuant to that Division are expressly set forth the Proclamation.</p>
What is discussed at an Applicants' BriefingWhat is discussed at an Applicants' Briefing<p>Applicants' Briefings cover topics such as application processing, eligiblility requirements, cost documentation guidance, record keeping, audit requirements, and deadline dates.  </p>
Why does Cal OES not make clear the significant risk property owners take assuming potential liability and waiving rights to file a claim when they sign the right of entry permit?Why does Cal OES not make clear the significant risk property owners take assuming potential liability and waiving rights to file a claim when they sign the right of entry permit?<p>​<br>Generally speaking, the Right of Entry permit for the tree mortality program is a contract between a property owner and the County. One of the terms in the contract is a hold harmless provision which is required by state law. Specifically, Government Code section 8682.6, requires that whenever a local agency is utilizing California Disaster Assistance Act funds to do a project, the local agency is required to hold the state harmless from damages due to the work for which the funds are allocated. As a result, Cal OES requires that the local agencies sign agreements holding the state and everyone working on behalf of the state - harmless. <br>Additionally, pursuant to 19 C.C.R. section 2925(a)(2)(C) to be eligible for California Disaster Assistance Act funds for debris removal activities: the local agency must have a signed statement from the property owner giving the local agency the right of entry and absolving the local agency and the state of any liability relative to removal.<br>If the property owner signed agreements excluding the contractors and the counties’ agents from the hold harmless provision it would not be an effective hold harmless provision in that it would not absolve the state and the local agency from any liability relative to the removal. <br>Ultimately, if the property owner desires to seek legal advice regarding the permit, the property owner is within his or her right to do so. If the terms are not palatable to the property owner, the property owner may decline to sign the permit and not accept services under the tree mortality program. In other words, the property owner may choose to directly pay for the work and negotiate a contract with a tree removal company.</p>
Why does Cal OES request the property owner take on additional risks by the assignment of certain responsibilities such as a utility location?Why does Cal OES request the property owner take on additional risks by the assignment of certain responsibilities such as a utility location?<p>​An example of the Right of Entry permit is enclosed herewith. Paragraph 1 of the permit requires, in relevant part, “[o]wner shall make Owner’s best efforts to mark any sewer lines, utilities, septic tanks and water lines located on the Premises.” This best efforts requirement of communicating, by marking, any sewer lines, utilities, septic tanks and water lines located on the Premises serves the interest of all parties, including the property owner. Accordingly, based upon that clause alone, there are seemingly no additional risks assumed by the property owner.</p>
Why does Cal OES want a non-project specific right of entry permit (it does not state that it is solely for tree abatement and it does not limit the area to be inspected)?Why does Cal OES want a non-project specific right of entry permit (it does not state that it is solely for tree abatement and it does not limit the area to be inspected)?<p>The right of entry permit is for a specific purpose – debris removal relative to the tree mortality program. Paragraph 1 of the enclosed Right of Entry permit expressly addresses the purpose. ​</p>
Why does Cal OES not have a sunset clause or termination date in the permit?Why does Cal OES not have a sunset clause or termination date in the permit?<p>​The right of entry permit is for a specific purpose and therefore the permit is valid until the purpose is achieved. For purposes of the debris removal program, pursuant to 19 CCR section 2925, the removal of debris from private property occurs when there is an immediate threat to public health and safety. Further, debris removal is considered necessary when removal will: “(1) eliminate immediate threats to life, public health, and safety; (2) eliminate immediate threats of significant damage to improved public or private property; or, (3) be necessary for the permanent repair, restoration, or reconstruction of damaged public facilities.” (19 CCR § 2925 (b)). Accordingly, the time frame for the permit is based upon the fulfillment of the purpose for which the permit was granted.</p>
Why has Cal OES taken such a different legal approach to the right of entry and tree removal program from what is being done by Caltrans?Why has Cal OES taken such a different legal approach to the right of entry and tree removal program from what is being done by Caltrans?<p>​Cal OES’s right of entry and tree removal program is funded in part by California Disaster Assistance Act funds. Different sources of funds have different legal requirements. As discussed above, whenever a local agency is utilizing California Disaster Assistance Act funds to do a project, the local agency is required to hold the state harmless from damages due to the work for which the funds are allocated. As a result, Cal OES requires that the local agencies sign agreements holding the state and everyone working on behalf of the state - harmless.</p>
Why is the right of entry permit language different in other counties?Why is the right of entry permit language different in other counties?<p>​Cal OES is unable to fully address this question without knowing which counties you are referring to in your question. That said and as discussed above, whenever a local agency is utilizing California Disaster Assistance Act funds to do a project, the local agency is required to hold the state harmless from damages due to the work for which the funds are allocated. Accordingly, there must be an agreement in place that holds the state harmless from damages.</p>
How do I join Cal OES ArcGIS Online Group?How do I join Cal OES ArcGIS Online Group?<p>​​Joining ArcGIS is easy!  Make sure you have an <a title="Link to ArcGIS" href="https://www.arcgis.com/home/" target="_blank">ArcGIS Online for Organizations</a> account, then contact <a href="mailto:gis@caloes.ca.gov">gis@caloes.ca.gov</a></p>
What is GIS?What is GIS?<p>​<a title="ESRI GIS Information" href="http://www.esri.com/what-is-gis/" target="_blank">http://www.esri.com/what-is-gis/</a></p>
How can I use GIS for Emergency Management?How can I use GIS for Emergency Management?<p>​<a title="ESRI for Emergency Management" href="http://www.esri.com/industries/emergency-management" target="_blank">http://www.esri.com/industries/emergency-management</a></p>
01. What is an EAP and why is it important?01. What is an EAP and why is it important?<p>​An EAP is a written document that identifies potential emergency conditions at a dam and specifies preplanned actions to help minimize property damage and loss of life should those conditions occur.<br> <br>EAPs contain procedures and information that instruct dam owners to issue early warning and notification messages to downstream emergency management authorities. The document must also contain inundation map(s) demonstrating critical areas for evacuation-related actions. Additionally, EAPs:<br> <br>· Provide assistance and guidance to local jurisdictions on their emergency planning for dam failure events; and<br>· Aid local, state, and federal agencies with activities to ensure effective dam incident emergency response procedures and planning. </p>
02. Who is required to have an EAP?02. Who is required to have an EAP?<p>​Sections 6160 and 6161 of the California Water Code and Government Code Section 8589.5 require owners of state regulated dams to submit EAPs to Cal OES and the Department of Water Resources (DWR) Division of Safety of Dams (DSOD), unless the dam has been classified as low hazard by DSOD.</p>
03. What are dam hazard classifications?03. What are dam hazard classifications?<p>​The downstream hazard classifications are based solely on potential downstream impacts to life and property should the dam fail when operating with a full reservoir. These classifications are not related to the condition of the dam or its appurtenant structures. The definitions for downstream hazard classifications are based on the Federal Guidelines for Inundation Mapping of Flood Risks Associated with Dam Incidents and Failures (FEMA P-946, July 2013). FEMA categorizes the downstream hazard potential into three categories in increasing severity: Low, Significant, and High. DSOD adds a fourth category of “Extremely High” to identify dams that may impact highly populated areas or critical infrastructure, or have short evacuation warning times.</p>
04. What are the requirements if my dam is co-regulated by FERC?04. What are the requirements if my dam is co-regulated by FERC?<p>​An owner of a dam that is jointly regulated by the state and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) shall prepare an EAP in accordance with FERC guidelines.</p><p>Do not submit an EAP with "For Official Use Only (FOUO)" or "CUI/CEII" markings. We will not approve an EAP with these markings. An EAP can be submitted with the recommended markings, "Confidential: Not for Public Release."</p>
What is the purpose of DMA 2000 and how does it impact local Governments?What is the purpose of DMA 2000 and how does it impact local Governments?<p>​DMA 2000 places new emphasis on local mitigation planning. DMA 2000 requires local governments to develop and submit mitigation plans for FEMA approval as a condition of receiving Hazard Mitigation Grant Program (HMGP) project grants or Pre-Disaster Mitigation projects grants (PDM). </p>
05. How often is a dam owner required to maintain, update, and revise an EAP?05. How often is a dam owner required to maintain, update, and revise an EAP?<p>​Dam owners shall update their EAP, including inundation map(s), at least every ten (10) years. Updates are also required when there is:<br>· a significant modification to the dam or a critical appurtenant structure, as determined by DSOD;<br>· a significant change to downstream development that involves people and property.</p><p>· when the Inundation Maps expires or there is approval of new inundation maps.</p>
06. Are there any other statutory requirements for jurisdictional dam owners?06. Are there any other statutory requirements for jurisdictional dam owners?<p>​Yes. At least once annually, the dam owner shall conduct an EAP notification or tabletop exercise with local public safety agencies.<br> <br>Please see the <a title="This is a link to the Division of Safety of Dams webpage" href="https://www.water.ca.gov/Programs/All-Programs/Division-of-Safety-of-Dams" target="_blank">DSOD webpage</a> for statutory requirements related to inundation mapping.</p>
07. When is my EAP due?07. When is my EAP due?<p>​Deadlines for dam EAP submissions are:<br>· On or before January 1, 2018, if the hazard classification is extremely high.<br>· On or before January 1, 2019, if the hazard classification is high.<br>· On or before January 1, 2021, if the hazard classification is significant.</p>
08. Where should I submit my EAP?08. Where should I submit my EAP?<p>​Per legislation, the development of an EAP should be based on and include an inundation map approved by DSOD. After development, dam owners must submit the EAP to both Cal OES and DSOD. </p><p> </p><p>Please submit an electronic copy to <a href="mailto:eap@caloes.ca.gov" target="_blank"><u><font color="#0066cc">eap@caloes.ca.gov</font></u></a>.</p><p> </p><p>Due to COVID-19, a hard copy submittal of the EAP <span class="ms-rteStyle-Bold">drafts</span>, are not required. </p><p> </p><p>After <span class="ms-rteStyle-Bold">EAP Approval</span>, dam owners must submit one final hard copy EAP to the Dam Safety Division:</p><p>Dam Safety Planning Division Chief<br>California Governor's Office of Emergency Services<br>3650 Schriever Avenue<br>Mather, CA 95655</p>
09. How should I develop my EAP?09. How should I develop my EAP?<p>​California statute requires that EAPs be developed in accordance with FEMA’s Federal Guidelines for Dam Safety: Emergency Action Planning for Dams. Government Code Section 8589.5 also requires that the EAP must include at a minimum:<br>· Notification flowcharts and contact information<br>· The response process<br>· The roles and responsibilities of the dam owner and impacted jurisdictions following an incident involving the dam<br>· Preparedness activities and exercise schedules<br>· Inundation maps approved by DWR<br>· Any additional information that may impact life or property<br> <br>As needed, Cal OES will develop additional tools and information to aid in the EAP process. <br> <br>California law also requires that EAPs be developed in consultation with any local public safety agency that may be impacted by an incident involving the dam, to the extent a local agency wishes to consult. This process/outreach needs to be documented within the EAP.</p>
11. When does the 60 day review period begin?11. When does the 60 day review period begin?<p>​The 60 day review period begins when the Cal OES Dam Safety Planning Division receives the EAP with the approved inundation map included. If an EAP is submitted to<br> Cal OES without an approved inundation map, the review period will begin when the Dam Safety Planning Division receives the letter from DSOD that the applicable inundation map has been approved. </p>
12. I currently have an EAP. Can that be re-submitted for approval under the new requirements?12. I currently have an EAP. Can that be re-submitted for approval under the new requirements?<p>​If a dam owner has an existing EAP as of March 1, 2017, the owner can submit the inundation map within that plan to DSOD for approval. DSOD will review and may approve the inundation map if it is deemed sufficient. If DSOD approves the map, the dam owner may submit the EAP to Cal OES for review. </p>

 

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