Statewide Storm Recovery Resources

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Recovery resources

Governor Brown Takes Action for Storms Response, Recovery Impacts

 
On Mar. 19, 2017, Governor Edmund G. Brown Jr. requested a Presidential Major Disaster Declaration to aid with repairs to the damaged Oroville Dam spillway and to bolster state and local recovery efforts following February storms that caused major flooding, levee breeches, the evacuation of residents, power outages and extensive damage to roads and bridges across California. Click here for a link to the Governor’s request and full text of the emergency proclamation.

On Mar. 7, 2017, Governor Edmund G. Brown Jr. requested a Presidential Major Disaster Declaration to bolster state and local recovery efforts following late January storms that caused major flooding, mudslides, power outages and damage to critical infrastructure across California.
Governor Brown also issued two emergency proclamations due to storms in late January and February for 53 counties, which direct Caltrans to formally request immediate assistance through the Federal Highway Administration's Emergency Relief Program. The proclamations also direct the Office of Emergency Services to provide assistance to specified counties as a result of the late January storms. Damage assessments for the February storms and for the damaged spillway at Oroville Dam are ongoing. The Governor's request for a Presidential Major Disaster Declaration due to late January storms can be found here and the full text of the emergency proclamations issued today can be found here and here.

On Jan. 23, 2017, Governor Edmund G. Brown Jr. issued two emergency proclamations to secure funding to help communities respond to and recover from severe winter storms that caused flooding, mudslides, erosion, debris flow and damage to roads and highways.

The emergency proclamations issued due to January and December storms direct Caltrans to formally request immediate assistance through the Federal Highway Administration's Emergency Relief Program. The proclamations also direct the Office of Emergency Services to provide assistance to local governments.​​ Attested copies of the January and December storms emergency proclamations can be found here and here.

On Feb. 10, the Governor requested​ a Presidential Major Disaster Declaration for the state to bolster ongoing state and local recovery efforts following January storms that caused flooding, mudslides, erosion, power outages and damage to critical infrastructure across California.

Governor Brown also issued an executive order that adds the counties of Amador, Mono and Riverside to the 49 counties already included in the emergency proclamation issued last month due to January storms. The order also authorizes state funding through the California Disaster Assistance Act for 34 counties impacted by the storms and directs the California Department of Transportation to formally request immediate assistance through the Federal Highway Administration's Emergency Relief Program for Amador and Riverside counties.

The Governor's request for a Presidential Major Disaster Declaration due to January storms can be found here and the full text of the executive order issued can be found here.

Find out more about the Federal Disaster Declaration process here

Federal Agency Assistance Resources


President Declares Major Disaster in California

On April 2, 2017, the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) announced that federal assistance has been made available to the State of California to supplement state, tribal, and local recovery efforts in the areas affected by severe winter storms, flooding, and mudslides from February 1 to February 23, 2017. Federal funding is available to state, tribal, and eligible local governments and certain nonprofit organizations on a cost-sharing basis for emergency work and the repair or replacement of facilities damaged by severe winter storms, flooding, and mudslides in Alameda, Alpine, Amador, Butte, Calaveras, Colusa, Contra Costa, Del Norte, El Dorado, Glenn, Humboldt, Kings, Lake, Lassen, Marin, Mariposa, Merced, Modoc, Monterey, Napa, Nevada, Plumas, Sacramento, San Benito, San Joaquin, San Luis Obispo, San Mateo, Santa Barbara, Santa Clara, Santa Cruz, Shasta, Sierra, Siskiyou, Solano, Sonoma, Stanislaus, Sutter, Tehama, Trinity, Tuolumne, Yolo, and Yuba counties. 

On March 16, 2017, the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) announced​ that federal disaster assistance has been made available​ to the State of California to supplement State, tribal, and loca​l recovery efforts in the areas affected by severe winter storms, flooding, and mudslides from January 18 to January 23, 2017. Federal funding is available to State, tribal, and eligible local governments and certain private nonprofit organizations on a cost-sharing basis for emergency work and the repair or replacement of facilities damaged by severe winter storms, flooding, and mudslides in El Dorado, Kern, Los Angeles, Mendocino, Napa, Orange, Riverside, Sacramento, San Diego, San Luis Obispo, San Mateo, Santa Barbara, Santa Cruz, Trinity, Tuolumne, and Yolo counties. To read the official announcement of FEMA-4305-DR-CA, click here​.

On Feb. 14, 2017, the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) announced that federal disaster assistance has been made available to the State of California to supplement State, tribal, and local recovery efforts in the areas affected by severe winter storms, flooding, and mudslides from January 3 to January 12, 2017. Read the full announcement here​Federal funding is available to State, tribal, and eligible local governments and certain private nonprofit organizations on a cost-sharing basis for emergency work and the repair or replacement of facilities damaged by severe winter storms, flooding, and mudslides in Alameda, Amador, Butte, Calaveras, Contra Costa, El Dorado, Humboldt, Inyo, Lake, Lassen, Marin, Mendocino, Merced, Mono, Monterey, Napa, Nevada, Placer, Plumas, Sacramento, San Benito, San Luis Obispo, Santa Clara, Santa Cruz, Shasta, Sierra, Siskiyou, Solano, Sonoma, Sutter, Trinity, Tuolumne, Yolo, and Yuba counties.

Federal funding is also available on a cost-sharing basis for hazard mitigation measures statewide.​
Timothy J. Scranton has been named as the Feder​al Coordinating Officer for federal recovery operations in the affected area. Scranton said additional designations may be made at a later date if r​​equested by the State and warranted by the results of further damage assessments. 

To read the official Public Notice Major Disaster Declaration, FEMA-4301-DR-CA, click he​re.

To read the official Public Notice Major Disaster Declaration, FEMA-4305-DR-CA, click here​.​
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​Find out what Federal aid programs are available to California h​ere​.

Federal Aid Programs for the State of California

​Assistance for State, Tribal, and Affected Local Governments Can Include as Required:

​​Payment of not less than 75 percent of the eligible costs for debris removal and emergency protective measures taken to save lives and protect property and public health. Emergency protective measures assistance is available to State, tribal and eligible local governments on a cost-sharing basis. (Source: FEMA funded, State administered.)
Payment of not less than 75 percent of the eligible costs for repairing or replacing damaged public facilities, such as roads, bridges, utilities, buildings, schools, recreational areas, and similar publicly owned property, as well as certain private non-profit organizations engaged in community service activities. (Source: FEMA funded, State administered.)
Payment of not more than 75 percent of the approved costs for hazard mitigation projects undertaken by State, tribal, and local governments to prevent or reduce long-term risk to life and property from natural or technological disasters. (Source: FEMA funded, State administered.)

  

​Are you ready for the next storm?

Here are some easy ways to prepare and tips to keep in mind before the next big storm.

  • Prepare an emergency kit with a flashlight, batteries, bottled water, non-perishable food, blankets, warm clothing, first aid kit and other items you might need for several days.
  • Monitor local news and weather stations for updates.
  • Pay attention to alerts and warnings from authorities.
  • If you don't have to go out, stay home.
  • Use extreme caution around downed trees and slow down for debris in the street.
  • Treat all non-working traffic signal lights at intersections as stop signs.
  • Avoid all downed power lines and objects touching them. Report downed lines to your local authorities.
  • Keep pets inside and ensure they have shelter from the elements.

​Winter Weather Reads from the Cal OES Newsroom

Get Ahead of the Next Storm

California has had a very wet winter so far, and our drought-stricken state gladly welcomed the rain with open arms. The influx of precipitation, cloudy skies and wind reminds us of how badly our state needs the rainy days that we haven’t seen in a while...continue reading. ​

​Risk of Landslides of​ Rise with Winter Storms

Thirty-six years ago, one of the worst natural disasters occurred in the state of Washington. The major volcanic eruption at Mount St. Helens, caused by an earthquake weakening the north face, killed 57 people and reduced hundreds of square miles to wasteland...continue reading.

Much-Needed Rain Continues but Also Means Potentially Devastating Consequences 

Winter storms can often create havoc around the holidays, especially when traveling. But, as California’s historic drought extends into a sixth year, the state is in dire need of more rain and snow, and plenty of it. Sometimes, though, an abundance of precipitation can initiate...continue reading. ​​

​Prepárese Antes de un Desastre​

California es un estado con riesgos de desastre como terremotos, incendios forestales y tormentas – por eso es importante prepararse. Aquí están 10 maneras en que usted y su familia pueden preparar para un desastre...continuar​.

Know Where to Go Pound Sand 

You want to be ready for whatever comes your way, right? Whether it’s curve ball over home plate, a quarterback sneak in a game of backyard football, or an icy patch of snow on your favorite mountain run. OK, putting all sports analogies aside, readiness is crucial to...continue reading.​​

           

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​​​Snow & Ice

When the temperatures drop, snow and ice can create hazardous driving conditions. Here are resources to help. 

​​Road Conditions. Check current conditions with information from Caltrans. 

Winter Driving Tips. Caltrans offers tips for motorists.

​​Live Traffic Cameras. Get a live look before you get on the road.

 


 


 

 

​Flooding & Rain

Even in the midst of an historic drought, California is still susceptible to flooding, and even more so now after destructive wildfires left many areas in Northern and Southern California with dramatic burn-scarred hills.

    

​Debris ​Flow

It can take many years for vegetation to regrow in burn areas. Rain over an extended period creates elevated risks for flash flooding and debris flows. Awareness and preparedness is key. 

   

 

​​​​​Wind

Strong winds carry th​e risk of downed power lines, trees and other hazards. Be aware of your surroundings and on the lookout for potential hazards. 

​Strong winds are often associated with tornadoes. Though rare, tornadoes do happen in California.

Power outages are common during a wind storm. Learn what you can do if you find yourself in the middle of a power outage. 

 

 

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